The topic you choose must have enough depth that you can create a lot of content for it. This is important for building an authoritative site, for search engine optimization, and most importantly, for the end user. If you don't have enough content about a topic, you're not going to be taken very seriously as an authority on the topic and it's unlikely you can convince someone to make a purchase from you. 

I've learned so much with this course! KC Tan is an excellent instructor. He covers all the bases. Also, his facebook group and email list have both been a great value for me. I've made money using this method, and I'm hoping to start making even more by learning list building details in another of his courses that I just started. So glad I came across his courses.


I have developed what I think is a pretty cool 11-part auto responder series that solves a critical problem people have in my niche - it includes a number of affiliate links as well (although not clickbank - yet). I currently have a squeeze page set up which I'm driving traffic to through using FB ads, but I'm finding that I'm having to pay way too much for every conversion ( > $1.50 per conversion).
Cost per action/sale methods require that referred visitors do more than visit the advertiser's website before the affiliate receives a commission. The advertiser must convert that visitor first. It is in the best interest of the affiliate to send the most closely targeted traffic to the advertiser as possible to increase the chance of a conversion. The risk and loss are shared between the affiliate and the advertiser.
Please note that some of the links below are affiliate links and at no additional cost to you, I will earn a commission. Know that I only recommend products, tools and learning resources I've personally used and believe are genuinely helpful, not because of the small commissions I make if you decide to purchase them. Most of all, I would never advocate for buying something that you can't afford or that you're not yet ready to implement.
Many voucher code web sites use a click-to-reveal format, which requires the web site user to click to reveal the voucher code. The action of clicking places the cookie on the website visitor's computer. In the United Kingdom, the IAB Affiliate Council under chair Matt Bailey announced regulations[42] that stated that "Affiliates must not use a mechanism whereby users are encouraged to click to interact with content where it is unclear or confusing what the outcome will be."
Tremendeous free teaching, that helps clear the smoke on what it takes to get an online business going. BUT, you concentrated on click bank and said nothing about getting my web site going and all the necessary details. I always thought the web site as a business sign telling people that xyz is open for business, check it out! Otherwise, people would walk and not even knowing that your biz is open. True?
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