If I have a blog that is getting 100,000 page views a month that means that I’m probably getting at least 50,000 people to the site (most blogs will do between 1.2 to 1.4 pages per session). That means I have to try and get some small percentage of those people to buy something from me if I really want to do well. If I can’t get them to buy something then (in some cases) I have ads running on the site that will make me money anyways.
What a great post mate.This is brilliant for newbies who are struggling to get a start and build up some confidence in their ability to become successful.Just getting those first few sign ups and a sale or two is very inspiring when you are starting out.You make some good points about giving value first and then gently selling your offer,too many marketers like to sell,sell,sell.... This drives me nuts,so I guess it happens to most potential customers.I hope to get more brilliant content from you in emails in the future to help me build my business.
Affiliates were among the earliest adopters of pay per click advertising when the first pay-per-click search engines emerged during the end of the 1990s. Later in 2000 Google launched its pay per click service, Google AdWords, which is responsible for the widespread use and acceptance of pay per click as an advertising channel. An increasing number of merchants engaged in pay per click advertising, either directly or via a search marketing agency, and realized that this space was already occupied by their affiliates. Although this situation alone created advertising channel conflicts and debates between advertisers and affiliates, the largest issue concerned affiliates bidding on advertisers names, brands, and trademarks.[35] Several advertisers began to adjust their affiliate program terms to prohibit their affiliates from bidding on those type of keywords. Some advertisers, however, did and still do embrace this behavior, going so far as to allow, or even encourage, affiliates to bid on any term, including the advertiser's trademarks.
Long-tail keywords are search phrases, rather than one or two words. If you are planning to promote an online poker course for example, you might do some keyword research and decide that the term "online poker course" has too much competition from existing websites, but articles based on things like "When to push during a sit-n-go" don't have as much competition and may yield more traffic.
Set up the site. Choose a website building platform, such as WordPress, Joomla or Drupal. Next, choose a domain name and web hosting for your site. The domain name is your web address. Web hosting is a service that connects your site to the internet. Once you have your domain name and web hosting, go to the control panel of your hosting account and install your website platform. Design your website by choosing and installing a theme.[9]
Thanks! I have a few products mixed into my blog posts, and will be adding more. I have found CB to be a mixed bag so far - but need more time to see how it pans out. Also wondering about setting up more sites to follow the funnel you set up. I was pleased to hear you mention having 3 follow ups in the responder sequence. Someone else had suggested 10! I figured by 4 or 5 you lost them anyway.
If you have pop-ups and optins on every page, I would have to think that it would be a lot harder to convince someone to link to it. Especially since the pages where you have your optins (and probably receive the most traffic) are probably the same pages that you have your best content on as well that you'd be hoping to pitch in your outreach campaign.
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