Monthly Archives: November 2019

Q&A with Mark Alizart

The Bark’s conversation with the author of Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
Mark Alizart and his present dog Master Eckhart
Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
This thoughtful examination of the unique place dogs hold in society and the world is from one of Europe’s preeminent philosophers—Mark Alizart. The author delves into historical myth, religion, pop-culture and wherever canines intersect with big ideas. From Buddhism to Spinoza, he makes a compelling case on why dogs matter and articulates the important lessons they can impart to us. The Bark spoke with Alizart about this seminal work.

Enter to win a copy of this rare and engaging book.

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Top Ten Tips to Keep Your Pet Safe & Calm this Fourth of July

 

 

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Q&A with Mark Alizart

The Bark’s conversation with the author of Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
Mark Alizart and his present dog Master Eckhart
Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
This thoughtful examination of the unique place dogs hold in society and the world is from one of Europe’s preeminent philosophers—Mark Alizart. The author delves into historical myth, religion, pop-culture and wherever canines intersect with big ideas. From Buddhism to Spinoza, he makes a compelling case on why dogs matter and articulates the important lessons they can impart to us. The Bark spoke with Alizart about this seminal work.

Enter to win a copy of this rare and engaging book.

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Winter Warnings for your Dog

One might think that growing up in Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin would have inured me to the effects of bitter cold, hip-deep snow drifts, and blinding blizzards, but I think it did the opposite and sensitized me to those frigid conditions, instead. I freely admit I am not fond of winter. My aversion to winter is not without just cause. Here is a partial list of cold-weather dangers:

Hypothermia and frostbite. These are very real concerns in frigid climes. Signs of frostbite include discoloration of the affected area of skin (this discoloration is often pale, gray, or bluish); coldness and/or brittleness of the area when touched; pain when you touch the body part(s); swelling of the affected area(s); blisters or skin ulcers; areas of blackened or dead skin. Severe cases of frostbite can result in permanent disfiguration or alteration of the affected tissues, or worse, amputation or surgical removal of the necrotic (dead) tissues. 

Signs of hypothermia can include strong shivering and trembling followed by no shivering; acting sleepy, lethargic, or weak; fur and skin are cold to the touch; body temperature is below 95° F; decreased heart rate; dilated pupils (the black inner circle of the eye appears larger); gums and inner eyelids are pale or blue; trouble walking; difficulty breathing; stupor, unconsciousness, or coma.

Antifreeze poisoning. Spilled antifreeze presents a serious danger to your dog. Dogs are attracted to antifreeze because of its sweet taste, but just a lick or two can be deadly. There are antifreeze formulations that contain a bitter substance intended to deter ingestion, but they are still toxic if consumed.

 Antifreeze poisoning happens in two stages. In the first, which happens three to six hours after ingestion, your dog appears drunk – staggering, vomiting, falling down, and peeing a lot. Then your dog may appear normal, until the second stage begins, when the body starts to break down the ethylene glycol into other chemicals such as aldehyde, glycolic acid, and oxalate. This stage is dangerous because it can cause severe to fatal damage to the kidneys. If you suspect your dog has ingested antifreeze, get her to a veterinarian immediately. 

Ice-melting chemicals. The calcium and sodium chloride in rock salt that is used to treat roads and sidewalks is toxic to your dog. Dogs get the salt on their paws and fur, and lick it off to clean themselves. Signs of salt toxicity include extremes in water consumption (your dog may either drink excessively or stop drinking altogether); vomiting; diarrhea; lethargic or “drunk” behavior; seizures. 

While “pet-safe” salt is safer than regular rock salt, like “pet-safe” antifreeze, it is still not completely safe. Take precautions to avoid ingestion, and contact your veterinarian if you think your dog might have salt toxicity. 

Falling through ice. Every winter brings tragic stories of dogs falling through pond or river ice, and drowning or freezing to death. Sometimes the tragedy is compounded by the death of the human who tried to save the beloved dog. If your dog doesn’t have a rock-solid recall, keep her safely on leash when you are around frozen water. If she does fall through, call 9-1-1 rather than trying to rescue her yourself. If you must rescue her, study up on ice-rescue safety precautions well in advance, and be very careful! 

Heaters. A chilly dog can become a heat-seeking missile and may try to cozy up to the heaters in your home. Caution: She can burn herself on a wall heater or wood-burning stove, or knock over a space heater and start a fire. If your dog is prone to trying to get as close as possible to the source of your home’s heat, use management tools to prevent her access to any heat source that might be dangerous. Provide her with a pet-safe heating pad; these products have chew-resistant cords, and heat up only to a pet’s internal body temperature. Alternatively, give her a cozy den with plenty of warm blankets she can burrow under.

The post Winter Warnings for your Dog appeared first on Whole Dog Journal.

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Dinosaur skull turns paleontology assumptions on their head

A team of researchers has unearthed a well-preserved Styracosaurus skull — and its facial imperfections have implications for how paleontologists identify new species of dinosaurs. Nicknamed Hannah, the dinosaur was a Styracosaurus — a horned dinosaur over five meters in length with a fan of long horns. Paleontologists have learned much from those horns — because they aren’t symmetrical.

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Q&A with Mark Alizart

The Bark’s conversation with the author of Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
Mark Alizart and his present dog Master Eckhart
Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
This thoughtful examination of the unique place dogs hold in society and the world is from one of Europe’s preeminent philosophers—Mark Alizart. The author delves into historical myth, religion, pop-culture and wherever canines intersect with big ideas. From Buddhism to Spinoza, he makes a compelling case on why dogs matter and articulates the important lessons they can impart to us. The Bark spoke with Alizart about this seminal work.

Enter to win a copy of this rare and engaging book.

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Dogs Are Life

Lowered risk of mortality associated with having a dog

Having dogs means living better. It’s hard to argue with that and who wants to, anyway? Well, there’s no arguing with two new studies that conclude that having dogs means living longer. Two recently published studies have found that people with dogs have a reduced mortality risk.

Researchers analyzed multiple studies from 70 years of research on nearly 4 million people in North America, Scandinavia, the UK, Australia and New Zealand. They found that having a dog lowered the combined risk of death from all causes by 24 percent. For people who had previously had a heart attack, the associated benefit of having a dog was a 31 percent reduction in the likelihood of death caused by a cardiovascular event.

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President Trump Praises Hero Dog Wounded in Isis Raid

Conan Hero Dog

This week President Trump made an appearance in the White House Rose Garden with Conan, the Belgian Malinois who participated in the special forces raid in Syria that resulted in the death of Isis leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.  Conan was “slightly wounded” when Baghdadi killed himself with an explosive in his Syrian compound. Reports are that demand for this rare, excellent working dog breed are soaring due to the hero’s notoriety … no doubt by many who do not understand the demands of these smart-as-a-whip working dogs, and the extraordinary training and active lifestyle that best serves them. For those of you tempted by the allure of purchasing the equivalent of a canine Navy SEAL—resist and adopt a mutt from your local shelter. You both will be better served.

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Q&A with Mark Alizart

The Bark’s conversation with the author of Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
Mark Alizart and his present dog Master Eckhart
Dogs (A Philosophical Guide to Our Best Friends)
This thoughtful examination of the unique place dogs hold in society and the world is from one of Europe’s preeminent philosophers—Mark Alizart. The author delves into historical myth, religion, pop-culture and wherever canines intersect with big ideas. From Buddhism to Spinoza, he makes a compelling case on why dogs matter and articulates the important lessons they can impart to us. The Bark spoke with Alizart about this seminal work.

Enter to win a copy of this rare and engaging book.

Continue reading

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Unique sled dogs helped the inuit thrive in the North American Arctic

The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.

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